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Archetypes

One of the decks that I have chosen to work with for the monthly cards is the new Archetypes deck from The Wild Unknown. I love this deck (and will be posting a detailed review for you to see this deck in depth), but to be clear, a tarot deck is filled with archetypes. An oracle deck is filled with archetypes. The whole world is filled with archetypes. You do not need this specific deck in order to work with archetypes. Like Kim Krans says in the guidebook, there is no one creator of archetypes.

This deck is one of the most beautiful decks I possess. If you want to work with an Archetypes deck, I cannot recommend this one enough.

Archetypes are created for and by the collective; that is precisely what makes them an archetype. This deck merely includes the archetypes that Kim Krans felt most connected to in her artistic rendering. The reason that I chose, and want to work with, this deck for the entire year of 2020 is because archetypes are meant to be opened, shared, understood, and integrated. However, as we begin to open the door to the Desert (the archetype for January) it is important to know and understand what exactly an archetype is.

http://www.dictionary.com defines archetypes as:

the original pattern or model from which all things of the same kind are copied or on
which they are based; a model or first form; prototype.

(in Jungian psychology) a collectively inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought,
image, etc., universally present in individual psyches.


This means that each archetype once started as on original form of itself and took on an identity that transcends the form. Archetypes are steeped in the psyche of the collective, across culture, location, or time. This means that archetypes are therefore steeped in the individual’s psyche as well. Archetypes can take on various layers of form or understanding, but the core identity of the archetype remains the same.


For instance, if I asked you to draw an image in your mind of a witch, what form does it take for you? If I were to mention a female deer, do you see the doe as a victim of the hunt, or as a radiant earth-mother? Both themes exist with the archetype of the doe. The hunt and persecution of a female deer (Bambi anyone?) can then unfold to other archetypes. The gun is often an archetype for male domination and sex (Freud is the most well-known for attributing these phallic archetypes to the idea of male regeneration and women with penis envy). The archetype of the orphan comes in when the Bambi’s mother has been shot down because Bambi is now left alone in this now cruel world.

There is often an overt sexual tone to the archetype of the hunt as well. The pursuer and the pursued match each other in raw visceral energy, opening the door to both themes of violence and sex. I recommend reading the poem Pursuit by Sylvia Plath (a poem written right after she met her future husband, the daunting, charismatic, and unfaithful Ted Hughes) to see how the archetype of the hunt mirrors both themes of violence and sex, predatory
and prey.

I have seen readers post their opinion of Pursuit as one of the most erotic poems Plath has ever written. I would agree with this statement, even though the erotic nature of this poem also exposes a masochistic, shadowed side of eroticism.


Archetypes create the way for more archetypes. The archetype of the temple gives way to the archetypes of prayer, candle, healer. The archetype of the ruler brings up the archetype of the crown, the throne, the castle. What this means is that archetypes are fluid, born of the collective perception, but understood through symbols, images and stories. Archetypes arise from the psyche in a way that can show a connection of understanding to the collective narrative. This connection often anchors and comforts us, because it gives us an outline that we can
identify within ourselves.

Do you, or do you know people who like to see which Disney, Star Wars, or Superhero character they get on a Facebook quiz? Those are archetypes. They may not be the most accurate, more based on algorithms that honest answers, but it can be comforting to know that your answers reveal an archetype that speaks to you. In fact, while doing some research for this blog post I came across the Jungian Archetype test. You can take it by clicking here.


Another article that really helps to showcase how influencing archetypes are is here. In this article, Jeffrey states that archetypes are patterns of behavior. Archetypes arise during certain situations depending upon predispositions, attitudes, and even perhaps nature versus nurture. These archetypes can, again, be broken down, into smaller categories or other archetypes to explain the complex and multifaceted nature of the
human experience or human psyche.


In looking at the archetype of the Desert, we can immediately pull on other archetypes to create a deeper understanding. For me, the Sun (another magnanimous archetype) is present. Many depictions of the Desert also show cacti or even the iconic bull skull. This archetype is one of harsh and fierce, but beautiful energy. The Desert is an archetype that speaks to survival and death. It also speaks to being lost, exposed, and lacking in some way.
I have gone in depth to the Desert in my zine which you can access by clicking here.


There is way to much to say about archetypes to be fully contained into one blog post. I would like to end here by saying that archetypes, however you hold to them or not, is something to be open too. Look to where the Desert, or other archetypes, are opening for you. Look to where archetypes are speaking to you, to an idea, or a pattern of behavior and see how the archetype resonates with you. Working with archetypes can be incredibly challenging, highly revealing, or sometimes comical and fun.

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Cards of the Week: Lady Luna’s Magick and the Hanged Man

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“Slow in my darkness, I explore /  the hollow gloom with my hesitant stick, / I, that used to figure Paradise / in such a library’s guise.” ~ Jorge Luis Borges Poem About Gifts

Hello and Happy Labor Day. The labor is constant, a never-ending cycle of its own. Much like the moon, the work we put in goes from virgin ideas, to maiden voyages, to crone knowledge. This coming week will continue to reflect that cycle.

We return again to Lady Luna’s Magick, to the cycles that unfold like clockwork, petal-woven into everything around us. These cycles take time and effort. Although each week these cards are picked at random, it seems there is still energy that needs to pass. For this week, these cycles will be helped by the Hanged Man.

The Hanged Man, shown here as a bat, is completely comfortable and at ease in his awkward posture. The darkness holds the wall, placing a veil over the Hanged Man’s footing. Beneath him the darkness breaks into light. The bat is comfortable in the deep darkness. He does not rely on light to help him see. Obviously, we are not bats. We have not evolved to use echolocation, but the metaphor is still powerful.

As we look at our personal cycles, our inner tendencies or tricks, it is important to remember that this focus cannot always come from a place of comfort. Sometimes, in order to fully understand the layers of both science and magic in us, we must succumb to the vision, and not the sight.

Max Ernst. Cover for Repetitions (1922). *eye is open but it can't see*

In the light, the Hanged Man and his unorthodox approach, will test us. When we are shoved into a dark corner, we must rely on other tools and knowledge. We can feel the surroundings. We can hear the echos, uninhibited by wall or structure. His ability to adapt, and thrive is what is needed to help find the strike that started the fire. These cycles, good or bad, are part of our inner tapestries. This approach does require us to surrender into the voyage. But there is one cycle that, despite the blows it can bring, can always be used as a guide: memory.

Be careful not to let this surrender diminish the faith you have in yourself. In the dark, The Hanged Man can reveal our insecurities and our flaws. The weaknesses in some of our cycles will be revealed. By itself, this knowledge is not bad. It is just a truth. The truth can become a shadow if we fixate on our flaws, and we do not put forth an action or forgiveness.

Reminiscent of Max Ernst’s Une Semaine de Bonté, Japanese collage artist Q-TA incorporates Victorian and Renaissance characters into surreal, and sometimes exceedingly strange, situations and metamorphosis.

For this week, look to your cycles and your inner gravity in a new light. One of the most beautiful things about Lady Luna’s Magick is her almost unbearably strong feminine energy. She is the positive charge. Her own physical makeup is what gives us the light of the Sun again. She gives us the tides, and helps keeps this tender planet held on its axis. Look to your own inner charges. Look at them in a new way, from a new angle, in a new setting. This is how we will learn what light we are reflecting out.

 

**Thank you for reading. Please comment and let me know how either of these cards are manifesting for you. Please follow if you like what you read, and you would like to become part of my wolf pack. If you would like a reading, please email me at teaandtombstones@gmail.com.

 

Decks used are the Wild Unknown tarot deck and the Oracle of the Dragonfae oracle deck. Click here to find the Wild Unknown tarot deck for purchase, and here to find the Oracle of the Dragonfae for purchase. (These are not affiliate links)

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Card of the week: Reversed Father of Cups

 

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“In the mountains, where the pines bend and sigh like my swans. / At the table, where the teapot presides like my swans, over all lesser things. / My swans were sharp and hungry as desire, and I fed and forgave  /  them too.” ~ Veronica Patterson Where are My Swans?

 

Last week, we were standing on our edge, puncturing the flat surface of our internal lakes to unleash the flowing ripples. Now that the waters have been stirred, now that we have started to form that link between the oceans we endure and the shores we wait on, we need to focus on what that means for our emotions. Letting the creatures surface empowers us to hear that wild call and let our emotions start to shake. This comes with responsibilities. We need to rule with a thick skin, but a warm heart.

The father swan swims alone, black like obsidian. He is apart from the rest. This does not bother him. Behind him is a deluge. Again, he is undeterred. He gracefully floats, comfortable and at ease. He is completely folded in proper corners of awareness and insight. Because the Father of Cups is reversed here, his energy is on the internal level, not quite ready to breach the surface.

In this space, we need to be accountable for the emotions we hold. These emotions could manifest and leave the skin, or they could stay covered, continuing to ride the unseen currents. Wherever they end, these emotions carry weight. Our emotions are part of our cosmic canyons, heavy in consequences and rewards.

James Roper

In the light, the reversed Father of Cups speaks to gaining a grip on our emotions, and how it helps us conquer ground. We can internally process and grow, We can ignite the tinder of our circumstances and relationships. Here, we choose what we carry, and let what is important be known to others when the time is right. In this sacred space, there isn’t a need to fight others in pursuit to wave our emotional flags. We can bear the storm of circumstance, take what is given, and melt it down to be reborn again, soft as gold or hard as a diamond. We can be adorned in black feathers in a sea of white, and never feel out of place.

In the shadows, these emotions can turn toxic if we let them. Instead of using our emotions to buoy us, we can make them an anchor to take us down, believing we made a difference. It is normal to want our emotions to carry us across the waves, but we need to take point. We need to harbor ourselves ashore and safeguard the provisions we have. Emotions can be a beast to bear, becoming overwhelmed is an incredibly normal feeling, especially in the time and social climate we are in. But instead of trying to bargain our emotions for a physical reward, we should assume the role of beast and stand firm in the darkest nights. It could be easy to become a victim of our emotions, but where would we be if we let that happen?

This is a BEAUTIFUL piece of art!

For this week, turn inward. Observe what emotions you carry or consume. Seek control and lead yourself through each day. If there is an obstacle, find a way through it. If there is someone or a situation that stands against you, clearly decide if your emotional fight is worth the battle scar. Let the emotions be fluid and reside in your internal house. The reversed Father of Cups shows us that we can maintain dominion, and fill ourselves to the ribs with good and bad emotions. They are a catalyst for beauty and war, and all the rolling thunder in between. What we take and give is a choice.

 

**Thanks for reading. Please let me know how the reversed Father of Cups manifests for you. Hit FOLLOW and become part of my tribe. If you would like a personal reading, please email me at teaandtombstones@gmail.com.**

Tarot card is from The Wild Unknown. Click here to purchase this tarot deck. (This is not an affiliate link)