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Working on the world, your visions, and yourself

Top (left to right): 3 of Swords, 3 of Pentacles, 3 of Cups. Bottom: 3 of Wands

The 3 of Wands is all about stepping into your present to forge your future. This means that you need to merge yourself with the larger energies also present. It is fair to say this is not an easy task when in creation. It can be easy to look on others both close to you or distant and see where their lives have stacked up in a way yours might not have yet. This is something that we often see talked about with social media. We should remind ourselves that what we see is a highlight reel, and not always demonstrative of someone else’s life as whole.

While this is a great point to make, it can be hard to times to remind ourselves of that when we are feeling buried under the weight of what we think must or should do to improve our lives, and the world. In order to engage with the world, work on the world, make a mark on the world, we must also engage with ourselves, work on ourselves, make a mark on ourselves.

For this reason, I think it is important to be reminded of the fact that in the traditional Rider-Waite Smith deck (and even here in my deck: the Ostara Tarot), the 3 of Wands is the only three to show a solitary figure. The 3 of Swords shows no figure, just a heart pierced through and through (worthy of its own post). This correlation shows that the 3 of Wands is often an isolated undertaking. The figure goes from the looking out of his balcony, to being in the action, adorned with a new vision, a new wand, new clothing, and a new headpiece.

So, what does this all mean? I think it means that when it comes to engaging your visions, making your mark on the world, and finding yourself in the process you have to remove the noise from others. That does not necessarily mean that you cannot heed any advice from someone you trust, nor does it mean you cannot ask for help when needed. What it does mean though is that at the end of the day, you have to rely on yourself and your skills. You have to be willing to trust in yourself, and when needed, to remove yourself from the constant chatter of society at large. The dialog with and from others is extremely important, but if it leaves us doubting and questioning the work that we do, it can lead to becoming a very toxic conversation.

Because the 3 of Wands is the card of the month, seek to deepen your own understandings of what is workable and do-able for you and your place in the world by creating some intentional silence. Work on what it is you want to see happen and remove your eyes from the google page to see if it has been done before, unless you looking to research, check facts, or give credit where credit is due. Work on your visions by acting as if you are in a relationship with them, because you are. Give them time to develop into something wonderful, or something no longer worth the effort. Trust that your needs can fit in there without too much force, and when needed your basic needs must come first from time to time. Work on the world by letting that silence be an invitation to listen to what the world needs. Let the work for the world be a resounding drum that comes from your own beating heart. At the end of the day, you and only you, can create your visions into something tangible and external. Only you can create that which you seek.

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Card Comparison: The Emperor

The Two Emperors: Ostara tarot and the Wild Unknown

There are many things that move across the cards, particularly the Major Arcana, like a wave, no matter the image. This bloodline of understanding, symbolism, or definition comes from the archetype, the held knowledge of numbers and namesakes.

The Emperor is no different. When the word EMPEROR is said, each one of us can visualize something. He or she may look different. The kingdom may hold different colors and material grandeur. But, the general understanding of an Emperor is a ruler who stands alone. He is the beacon of order for all that he rules.

It is because of this general understanding that the Emperor is often given a fierce and authoritative connotation. In this post, we will not be looking so much at the card definition and attributes. If you would like to read my interpretation of the Emperor please click here to go to my interpretations of the Wild Unknown card meanings. You will find the Emperor, as well as all the cards that I have thus far written a personal interpretation for.

In this post, we will be taking time to look at the Emperor across the two decks that I own: the Wild Unknown tarot and the Ostara tarot. These two cards will be examined and shed light on the nuance that they bring to the interpretations of the Emperor.

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Starting from left to right, we have the Emperor from the Ostara tarot. Unlike many other decks that depict the Emperor as a wise or authoritative older man, here the Emperor is young. He wears not a crown of gold or jewels, but two horns that symbolize his dominion over the natural earth. He is of both worlds, showing that he can understand the rule of law and the laws of nature.

These combined together can create balance in the physical fabric of the world. His youth means that he has vigor, and he does not rely on others to to uphold or protect those whom he serves. His gaze is off in the distance, showing that his vision is on the horizon, far off in the distance. The symbols on his body show that he is also mysterious, something seen hardly at all in other decks. In fact, the directness of other decks (which we will see in the Wild Unknown) is the antithesis of mystery. But these symbols as part of his physical body means that he is learned in other languages, ones that may unlock other mysteries that can serve and protect. He has taken the time and embodied the learning the different languages that are part of his world.

He also does not depict a foreboding or fierce figure. He seems gentle, a little wild or mischievous perhaps, but his face is beautiful and soft. As a counterpart to the Empress, he also holds the a childlike whimsy to create and protect the world that he is a part of.

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The Emperor in the Wild Unknown is depicted as a large tree. The size of the tree emphasizes age and time. A tree that big has been around for a long time. This sticks with the more traditional definition of Emperor as one with the benefit of experience because of age and time. Behind the Emperor is a brilliant, fiery sun, which may be the crown of the natural world.

With this brilliance comes clarity of vision, and fire for action. In this deck, the Emperor as a tree speaks to action in terms of giving. At this size, he acts like one of many lungs for the planet, taking in loads of carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen. Trees this size create a canopy for the sky, and a network for the soil. They are a home for the fauna, shade for the weary, and a beacon for the lost.

The Emperor is depicted in only one color. He is stark black, resembling his stark nature, perhaps a little harsh and direct, but beautiful and giving nonetheless. There is also a notion of simplicity with this card, which is very different from the other Emperor. The symbols that adorned the Emperor’s body speak to a complicated understanding of different languages and symbolism in this world. Here, the Emperor is much more simplistic. He is there, front and center. He is visible, giving, nurturing, but also abrupt in palate to some.

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There you have two different images for the Emperor. I hope these comparisons help show how the image brings nuance and layers to the knowledge of the cards. Please let me know how these, or other images of the Emperor resonate with you. Much love.

Ashlie

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Card Comparison: 2 of Swords

2 of swords comparison

This month has been a deep dive into the 2 of Swords, which can be a challenging card. It is a card of layers, of merging and morphing multiple energies into a streamline of conscious action that initiates a change. What this means is that the card resembles and holds multiple energies at once. These energies can be challenges, calls to action, or reminders. Because there is so much to this card, it is interesting to see how the images are depicted to convey these dualities.

These two cards come from The Wild Unknown Tarot (depicted on the right), and the Ostara Tarot (depicted on the left). If you have multiple decks and are struggling to learn a card, compare the two. Sometimes seeing the multiple interpretations can help spark insight. If you do not have multiple decks, you can reach out and ask me to put up a picture, or use Google.

The Ostara Tarot shows a blindfolded blue jay perched on her nest, which has been created by using the two crossed swords as scaffolding. The swords seem to block a path that transitions from flat and easy to rocky terrain in the distance. As with all cards there is both light and shadow shown. This card shows that there can be comfort in the midst of a daunting setting. If we can come to terms with our thoughts becoming action or creations in the midst of an uncomfortable setting, then we can truly thrive in adaptability. We can use that which could be a setback or a threat, and turn it into a foundation.

This card also shows how strong instinct is, and how our mind can be channeled to create and compete, even when the cards are stacked against us. This Blue Jay was able to create her nest blindfolded and without damage done to her beautiful body. The instinct to create her home is so strong that it can be done no matter the cost. But this also opens the shadow side. Why would she create her nest here? It is admirable that she abilities are unchanged when she loses sight, but her home will never be free from danger. If she wishes to build a foundation free from any danger she will have to leave this place, and start down the path set for her towards new unknowns and new challenges.

This shadow side shows us that even when we achieve mental clarity from the Ace there can be residue from our former selves that we have to leave behind. This comes with intellectual honesty. We cannot be in the same routines to create change. If we receive inspiration and a new path, we must make the decision to shed our former habits and admit there is more to learn for integration. There is more that lies ahead, but we must be willing to lighten the load and act accordingly.

The 2 of Swords from The Wild Unknown also shows two crossed swords and in the middle of the V is a solar eclipse. A bright and fiery sun is concealed by the moon. This softens the harsh lights, but it conceals needed things. This, like the other card, shows an element of danger. If we attempt to stare head on at this occurrence we are both physical and metaphorically blinded. We need the sun to shine light on reality, to expose all that is around us so we can accurately act. But we need the influence of the Moon, with all its fluidity and watery pull.

This card shows that we need to work with both elements. We need to be willing to see reality for what is, but we need our intuition to guide us accurately. Intuition is a powerful thing. Just like any warrior who fights with these formidable blades, we need to move like in a dance. We need to be one with our thoughts and action, but that requires a compass of honesty and truth. The two crossed swords can be both a stance of protection and attack. This stance can protect us against coming attacks, but it can also be a combustion of strength and power.

What is needed is action. This card shows that indecision is a greater threat than an attack against us. We cannot hold this pose for long. We must move to honor our new path, otherwise we yield to stagnation. We could potentially stay here longer than welcome, but we would tire and succumb to neither victory or defeat. Both of these carry needed lessons if we are to grow.

Please let me know your thoughts on 2 of Swords. It is a card that combines a lot of energy. Take things slow. We are just at the beginning of new mental ground. It can be scary and elevating at the same time. Stay wild Wolflings!

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The Fool: Tarot Deck Comparisons

The Fool tarot comparisons

One of the best things about tarot cards is that the meaning of the cards is never stale. The roots of each card are alive, spreading the nourishing gift of emotional sustenance. There is no one formula for each card that applies undoubtedly to other decks, or to each reader for that matter. The same reader can use two different decks for the same, or similar questions, and come up with very different responses from two alike cards. Obviously, these are my own thoughts, and there is no one right way to read or compare the cards.

I want to share some thoughts I have for The Fool from my two tarot decks, The Wild Unknown and the Ostara Tarot. If you look back to my old school posts, you can see that the Wild Unknown was my first deck. It was the very first one I learned to read. I finally made the purchase to acquire a second deck, and I chose the Ostara Tarot. I chose that deck actually because of The Devil card in particular (but that is a different post for a different day).

The left card is The Wild Unknown depiction of the Fool. The right is the Ostara Tarot depiction of the Fool. I will share the similarities of each card, the differences in meaning, the pros and cons of each card, and the one (if there is one) that speaks to me the most.

The Fool from The Wild Unknown is a baby chick, perched and ready for flight. Above the branch the expansive sky is golden, showing that it is a treasure to be one of the few creatures in this world that can navigate this path. It is endless and full of light. Below the branch is bleak, darkening into the depths of the plummet. Clearly this precipice is going to take heart and guts. Both above and below are unknown. Above brings freedom. The sky brings possibilities and the ability to grow.

This is also seen in the other Fool. A young girl grasps her broom. She has already taken flight. Although what is behind her is also dark, the obstacle that struck me was the way the artist depicted the tumult of wind. Her hair is blowing behind her, and birds all are around her, always trying to brave the way. Here, this Fool shows that although the leap of faith was taken, the path is not just smooth sailing. She will be confronted with dangers and threats, even though this is clearly the path she was destined for.

One of the main differences that I see in these cards is the perception or perceived feeling of preparedness.  The chick looks small and frail, but animals are always so inspirational to me. No matter how unable and weak they seem, they were made for their environments. Thousands of years of evolution have allowed such small babies to take the most daring of leaps. The girl, on the other hand, has more of the traditional look of the classical Fool. She is young. She is so ready for her adventure that she doesn’t even notice that her shoes are untied. But if you look closely, she has red elbows and scratched knees. This isn’t her first attempt, but she kept trying.

Both of these young Fools speak to new beginnings. The pros of the Wild Unknown are the clear demonstration of following your calling. If birds who are meant to fly, but never can, they will mostly likely die. The pros also show that the journey is worth more than anything. The chick is surrounded by flowers and comfort, but still she knows she must fly. The pros from the Fool from the Ostara Tarots shows the layers of the journey. The young girl has bloody knees, and a wind that could overpower her. But she persists. She dares to fly amongst the birds and the height.

In truth, I don’t find one speaks to me more than the other. I will say I love the Fool from the Wild Unknown. I love the idea of following what must be done before our physical forms go back to the dust and the stones. I relate to that Fool perhaps a little more because for a while I tried to make my way on the branch, where there was true comfort. The flowers show that the start is not a bad place. But the fact that I hadn’t leaped into my own sky meant that the deep depth felt like it was encroaching more inch by inch.

I would love to hear what you think of these cards, or of the Fool in your cards. You can find the Wild Unknown deck at www.thewildunknown.com. I purchased my Ostara Tarot deck from Amazon. These are not affiliate links.

We all have been the Fool at some point, and it is a beautiful place, despite the obstacles. Stay wild wolflings.